As we step into the New Year, the air is thick with resolutions. Everywhere we turn, we’re encouraged to make lists of goals, to strive for improvement, to set our sights on transformation.

But in the midst of this season of change, I propose we take a different approach. Let’s talk about unresolutions – the things we will not do this year.

Here are five unresolutions that can help us embrace grace and faith on our caregiving journey.

 

#1 I Will Not Compare My Journey to Others

Each caregiving experience is as unique as a fingerprint. This year, I resolve not to compare my journey to anyone else’s. Comparison can steal our joy and make us feel inadequate. Instead, let’s celebrate the individual paths we’re on, acknowledging that each challenge and triumph is part of our own story.

 

 

I Will Not Neglect My Own Needs

It’s easy to put our own needs on the back burner when we’re caring for a loved one. But this year, let’s make an unresolution to not neglect ourselves. Self-care isn’t selfish; it’s necessary. By taking care of our own physical, emotional, and spiritual needs, we’re better equipped to care for others.

 

 

I Will Not Hold Onto Guilt

Guilt can be a heavy burden for family members who find themselve in a caring season. We often feel like we’re not doing enough or that we could be doing better. This year, let’s release the grip of guilt. We’re doing the best we can with the resources and knowledge we have. Let’s forgive ourselves for the imperfections and celebrate the love we give every day.

 

 

I Will Not Fear Asking for Help

Sometimes, we think we need to do it all on our own. But caregiving is a team effort. This year, let’s make an unresolution to not fear asking for help. Whether it’s reaching out to family, friends, or support groups, let’s embrace the strength that comes from community.

 

 

I Will Not Forget to Find Joy in the Moment

In the midst of the caregiving routine, it’s easy to overlook the small moments of joy. This year, let’s unresolve to not forget to find happiness in the present. Whether it’s a shared laugh, a quiet conversation, or a peaceful walk, let’s cherish the precious moments we have with our loved ones.

 

As we embark on this year, let’s hold these unresolutions close to our hearts.

By focusing on what we won’t do, we might just find that we open ourselves up to more love, more grace, and more peace in our role as caregivers.

Let’s walk this path together, supporting each other with grace and faith every step of the way.

 

I would love to talk and share more about what it would look like to work together.

Email me today!

 

Rayna Neises, ACCRayna Neises understands the joys and challenges that come from a season of caring. She helped care for both of her parents during their separate battles with Alzheimer’s over a thirty-year span. She is able to look back on those days now with no regrets – and she wishes the same for every woman caring for aging parents.

To help others through this challenging season of life, Rayna has written No Regrets: Hope for Your Caregiving Season, a book filled with her own heart-warming stories and practical suggestions for journeying through a caregiving season. She is also the editor of Content Magazine– Finding God in Your Caregiving Season. Rayna is an ICF Associate Certified Coach with certifications in both Life and Leadership Coaching from the Professional Christian Coaching Institute.

She is prepared to help you through your own season of caring. Learn more at ASeasonOfCaring.com and connect with Rayna on FacebookLinkedIn, and Instagram.

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