Conflict is as natural to the human experience as thunderstorms are to springtime.  When left unchecked, conflict can generate heat and discomfort, disrupt interactions and destory relationships. 

Between a couple, discord can lead to divorce.

Between countries, hostilities can lead to war.

But when differences are openly acknowledged and addressed, conflict can be a powerful source of energy and lead to creative solutions that encourage growth, deepen intimacy and strengthen bonds between people.

The world is made up of individuals with different ideas, wants, needs and beliefs, and conflict may occur when our differences meet. Like so many other aspects of human interaction, it’s how we deal with controversy that affects our relationships—with others and ourselves.

Some relationships appear to be without conflict. This can mean that everyone is in tune with everyone else. But what’s more likely is that some people are not being honest and real with others, or that some individuals regularly and routinely acquiesce to others. This is true with a couple, in a family, or in any group. When conflict appears to be totally absent, it is best to take a look under the carpet.

For some, the inability to face conflict comes from old, deeply imbedded fears, such as the fear of being wounded or absorbed by another. Or some may fear that there is no resolution to the disagreement. In avoiding conflict, individuals may lose themselves in a forest of fears where no one says what they truly feel or want or believe.

Without resolution, conflict converts to stress that causes all sorts of ills and dis-ease and may ultimately release itself in explosions of rage, withdrawal, acting out, addictions and general unhappiness.

man sitting under a tree

However, with resolution comes the release of fear and tension, clarity and remarkably creative solutions or ideas. A feeling of closeness may result or, at the very least, a deeper understanding, acceptance and respect for one another.

If you are reluctant to engage in conflict resolution, consider the following:

  • Because people are different, conflict is natural.
  • It’s more important to find clarity and unity than to be right.
  • No one is right or wrong, good or bad; we’re just different.
  • Conflict is about speaking up and telling our truth.
  • Conflict is about being open and honest with others.
  • There is usually a win-win solution somewhere.
  • Resolving conflict keeps us from living in fear.
  • Resolving conflict helps up clarify, sort and value differences.
  • Resolving conflict can bring us closer together.
  • Resolving conflict is respectful of ourselves and others.

 

 

Rayna NeisesRayna Neises understands the joys and challenges that come from a season of caring. She helped care for both of her parents during their separate battles with Alzheimer’s over a thirty-year span. She is able to look back on those days now with no regrets – and she wishes the same for every woman caring for aging parents.

To help others through this challenging season of life, Rayna has written No Regrets: Hope for Your Caregiving Season, a book filled with her own heart-warming stories and practical suggestions for journeying through a caregiving season. Rayna is an ICF Associate Certified Coach with certifications in both Life and Leadership Coaching from the Professional Christian Coaching Institute.

She is prepared to help you through your own season of caring. Learn more at ASeasonOfCaring.com and connect with Rayna on FacebookLinkedIn, and Instagram.

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